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Pussy vs. Putin and the Nuclear Threat

KIEV – While Russia's President Vladimir Putin continues to raise tensions in Ukraine by amassing troops on the country's Ukrainian border following the annexation of Crimea earlier this month, also a balancing force campaigning for human rights comes from Russia in the form of Pussy Riot.

Cinema for Peace honored Pussy Riot in February at the Gala in Berlin and invited them to the Olympic Games in Sochi.  

The global tour brought Pussy Riot this weekend to Kiev, and on Tuesday they will travel with Cinema for Peace to a hearing at the European Parliament on the current developments in Russia, followed by a dinner together with the mother of Sergei Magnitzky and Bill Browder, whose global Magnitzky campaign is being used as a blueprint for the recent blacklisting of Russian officials involved in the Crimea crisis with travel bans and asset freezes. In 2013, Barack Obama signed in the US the Magnitzky Act, which punishes the people involved in the murder of Sergei Magnitzky in prison, after he had exposed the theft of 230 million USD from the Russian people by government officials and the Russian mafia.

Pussy Riot will also visit New York and Los Angeles, where Roland Emmerich ("Independence Day", "2012", "White House Down") will host a dinner in order to introduce Pussy Riot to the creative community as well as to raise funds for their new NGO Zona Prava that fights for the rights of prisoners, supported by artists such as Madonna.

We invite you to watch the following films:
  • PUSSY VS. PUTIN by Gogol's Wives
  • PUSSY RIOT - A PUNK PRAYER by Mike Lerner and Maxim Pozdorovkin follows the court cases on the Russian feminist/anti-Putinist punk-rock protest group Pussy Riot. Winner of the Cinema for Peace Most Valuable Documentary of the Year 2014 award.
  • JUSTICE FOR SERGEI by Hans Hermans and Martin Maat, winner of the "Cinema for Peace Award for Justice 2012", is a documentary film on Sergei Magnitzky, a Russian lawyer who died in November 2009 at the age of 37 under excruciating circumstances in a Moscow detention centre.


The Nuclear Threat


THE HAGUE – The third international Nuclear Summit took place in the The Hague this week with some promising results. The international initiative was launched with the help of US President Barack Obama in 2009 with an aim to prevent global nuclear terrorism.

The civilized world has already been on the brink of extinction due to nuclear arms. In 1962 the Cuban missile crisis brought the world close to a nuclear war when the Soviet Union deployed nuclear missiles in Cuba. However, the conflict was avoided at last minute through negotiations between Presidents Nikita Khrushchev and John F. Kennedy. 


An equally dangerous but secret moment in the history of nuclear threats  was experienced in 1983, when Russian officer Stanislav Petrov was in charge of the Russian nuclear early-warning system, which went off with howling sirens indicating a full-blown nuclear attack from the US. He was faced with a choice of launching a counter attack against the US, effectively erasing the land of the free from the map. Petrov tried to verify the threat by phoning the Kremlin and checking satellite photos for traces of potential launches. With the evening sundowning in the US, the photos showed hundreds of light points that could be left by launched nuclear warheads. However, Petrov went with his gut instinct and deemed the alarm as false – as was later confirmed to be the case. His judgment and decision avoided the start of World War III and a global nuclear holocaust.

Petrov will be invited by Cinema for Peace on November 8 and 9 to Berlin to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall in the company of the man who ended the insanity of The Cold War and the nuclear threat of extinction: President Mikhail Gorbachev. 

Cinema for Peace also hosted the 20th anniversary and invited MTV to present their main award at the Cinema for Peace celebratory dinner, as President Gorbachev could not attend the MTV awards. He thanked the "missile man", the international chairman of MTV, Bill Roedy, who was formerly in charge of US nuclear missile stations, and later promoted freedom and democracy by broadcasting MTV also across the iron curtain. 

The 25th anniversary will include a film screening of the documentary film "The Family" about the victims of the wall, a symposium on how to end all wars and an honorary dinner for Gorbachev and Genscher, the mastermind of the process which led to the fall of the wall.  

The Nuclear Summit and our film selection demonstrate the dangers of nuclear arms and energy. James Baker said already two decades ago that it is not a question if there will be a dirty nuclear bomb blown up by terrorists, but when this will happen for the first time.

When the last Nuclear Summit took place in 2010,  Ukraine agreed to remove highly enriched uranium from its nuclear fuel sites. Unfortunately, in many countries of the former Soviet Union there are still large amounts of nuclear material missing and on the black market, as can be seen in the documentary "Countdown to Zero".

Please see our film selection for more information on:
  • the dangers of uranium mining: "Don't Mine Me"
  • the threat that nuclear plants pose to humans and the environment: "Chernobyl Heart" and "Atomic Alert"
  • the threat of nuclear terrorism: "Countdown to Zero" and "Dirty War"
  • the uncontrollable danger of nuclear waste: "Into Eternity"
We invite you to watch the following films:
  • 13 DAYS by Roger Donaldson is A dramatization of President Kennedy's administration's struggle to contain the Cuban Missile Crisis in October of 1962.
  • THE MAN WHO SAVED THE WORLD – A clip about Stanislav Petrov who avoided nuclear holocaust.
  • INTO ETERNITY by Michael Madsen is a documentary on the safety of nuclear storage.
  • COUNTDOWN TO ZERO by Lucy Walker is a documentary about the escalating nuclear arms race.
  • BATTLE OF CHERNOBYL by Thomas Johnson is a documentary of the nuclear disaster of Chernobyl.
  • ATOMIC ALERT by Thomas Johnson is gives a thorough understanding of the strategic issues linked to nuclear energy and its risks on an international level, including public health, waste management, environmental and political issues.
  • CHERNOBYL HEART by Maryann DeLeo is an Academy Award-winning documentary that takes a look at children born with a deteriorated heart condition after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear plant disaster.
  • DIRTY WAR by Daniel Percival is a thriller that follows the journey of a radioactive isotope into England, where it is ultimately turned into multiple dirty bombs and detonated in central London. Meanwhile, the city of London conducts preparedness drills for a possible terrorist attack.
  • DON'T MINE ME by Ellen Downing is is a documentary about the effects of uranium mining on the Navajo Indian Reservation in the Southwest United States.
WATCH THE CINEMA FOR PEACE TRAILER OF THE WEEK:
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